RIZE ORCHESTRA PREMIERE CONCERT PROGRAM


1) “In Black” ft. Ken Like Barbie (Lyrics: Ken Like Barbie / Music: Adrian Dunn / Arranger: Marcus Norris)

2) “Lift Every Voice” (James Weldon Johnson / Music: J. Rosamond Johnson / Arr: Adrian Dunn, Arr. Dennis Atkinson Jr.)

3) “Ride On” (Jesus of Justice) ft. Adrian Dunn (Adrian Dunn ) 

4) “Peach Lemonade (Marcus Norris) 

5)    “BFTW” ft. 99TheProducer (Malik Johnson)

6) Ode to Hip Hop- Dear Mama (Tupac Shakur and Tony Pizarro / Arr. Dennis Atkinson Jr.)

7) “Living Single Theme Music” (Dana Owens / Arr. Caitlin Edwards)

8) “Bells” (Adrian Dunn & Marcus Norris)

9) “Need You More” featuring Cristina Raé  (Adrian Dunn)

10) “String Quartet No. 5, “Parks” Movement #2” (Daniel Bernard Roumain) Kedrick Armstrong Conductor

FEATURED ARTISTS

Special features include: vocalist Cristina Raé (Season 15 finalist on America’s Got Talent), spoken word artist Ken Like Barbie, pianist/producer Jason Tyson, Conductor Kedrick Armstrong, Principle violin- Caitlin Edwards and up-and-coming cellist/producer “99TheProducer” Malik Johnson.

ABOUT RIZE ORCHESTRA

Founded in 2019, the Rize Orchestra seeks to address the lack of diversity that is often found within the orchestral world.   The organization is a brainchild of Dunn and its purpose is two-fold: In addition to providing a national platform for the host of working musicians in Chicago, IL, the group also seeks to provide performance opportunities, mentorship and recording experience for collegiate musicians who would not otherwise readily receive that level of exposure.  All African-American students who are enrolled at any of the colleges or conservatories within the Chicagoland area are automatically granted membership within Rize. At the start of 2021, the group entered into a partnership with the Chicago College of Performing Arts at Roosevelt University.  Each year, the orchestra will present two full concerts and two masterclasses.

“The Rize Orchestra is an all black professional ensemble dedicated to the advancement of radical change in the classical and music industry complex,” says Dunn.  “We need this change at a time like this to change the narrative that Black musicians aren’t visible in American orchestras.  The Rize orchestra seeks to disrupt the way that we audition, we play and the attention or value we give to living Black composers.  Black music is a reflection of Black life, therefore Black music matters.  The Rize Orchestra will carry that message forward into the future: Black music matters, Black musicians matters, our lives matter.”